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Deep tech & artificial intelligence in Europe: full report

Written on October 29, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

As promised, a fresh report on European deep tech & artificial intelligence. Investment trends, notable companies, exits, and so much more. You don’t want to miss this one. Get the 25-page deck directly in your inbox below:

Deep tech & artificial intelligence in Europe

Download the 25-page slide deck now

What are Deep Tech and Artificial Intelligence?

Written on October 23, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

UPDATE 29 Oct 2017: the full report is now available for free download here.

This week Dealroom will release a free report on European deep tech & artificial intelligence. Ahead of that report, this is a preview.

What is Deep Tech?

Deep tech is (admittedly) a subjective term, but useful and frequently requested, in order to group companies that use cutting-edge technologies to solve complex problems. Examples include: artificial intelligence, robotics, autonomous driving & delivery, space-flight, aviation, computer vision, speech recognition, AR/VR.

What is Artificial Intelligence (AI)?

The above shows that AI is the most frequently occuring description within Deep Tech (it is also the broadest definition). The below schematic from Neota Logic shows the fields of specialisation within AI. For example, machine learning is a more narrowly defined specialisation within AI (where algorithms learn themselves, without needing to be literally 100% pre-programmed). These fields are not mutually exclusive. For example, natural language processing, vision, and speech recognition all make frequent use of machine learning.

What is an Artificial Intelligence company?

Artificial intelligence is increasingly applied across more “traditional” domains such as travel (Skyscanner), music (Spotify) and of course advertising. The term “artificial intelligence company” will therefore likely be obsolete soon, similar to the term “mobile company” (nearly every modern company is mobile-ready, albeit to varying degrees). An important distinction with mobile however, is that AI requires massive capital investments which only few can afford: computing power, data-aggregation, and skills. Either these costs will diminish quickly or true AI-capability is going to be highly concentrated around a few category killers (Facebook, Amazon, Google, Spotify) and potential future government-funded initiatives.

Europe’s top funded Deep Tech companies

The below data table shows several high-profile deep tech companies, ranked by amount of VC funding. The top three funded Deep Tech companies in Europe and Israel are Roviant, Improbable and Mobileye (click to open data-table):

Top investors

Europe and Israel have already generated several high profile Deep Tech exits, as the below data table shows:

Exits

Europe and Israel have already generated many exits:

For more information on Deep Tech in Europe, stay tuned for the full report later this week.

 

Enabling notifications to track companies and entire markets

Written on October 16, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

Want to track companies, investors and entire markets and receive notifications on them? Here’s how:

  • To track an individual company, visit any profile and then save it (click the heart symbol, then add it to a List)
  • To track an entire market, create a search, then save your search (your search must have less than 5,000 results)
  • You can then to view your notifications to see on mentions, found matches, rounds and exits. You can filter your notifications as shown in the image below.

To help you get started, please feel free chat with us on Intercom (bottom right of your screen). 

HelloFresh, Deliveroo and the path to profitability in Food Tech

Written on October 8, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

HelloFresh, the Berlin-based global meal kit service that’s 53% owned by Rocket Internet, is planning an IPO in October.

HelloFresh is said to be seeking a valuation of €2 billion, roughly 2x its run-rate revenues of €1 billion. Our online valuation multiples show that is double the 1x revenue multiple of Blue Apron, a U.S based close peer, which has been badly struggling after IPO-ing earlier in 2017.

HelloFresh has shown impressive growth in recent quarters of about 53% by revenues and customers, 3x faster than 18% growth for Blue Apron, which it has now also overtaken in size. Blue Apron even posted a net loss in active customers in Q2, and had to announce that it will scale back its marketing efforts. Incidentally, HelloFresh is also the second fastest hiring company in European Food Tech in the Dealroom database (after Deliveroo).

On the other hand, HelloFresh has yet to achieve positive gross margins (i.e. margins after cost of goods, fulfillment and marketing expenses). The below analysis shows what the path to profitability might look like:

In other words, if HelloFresh can reduce marketing expenses closer to Blue Apron’s 14% of sales, then positive gross margins and even positive EBITDA margins are well within reach. Today however, HelloFresh is burning about €100 million in cash per year and with €113 million of cash on the balance sheet this means it has about one year run-way left. An IPO is therefore very welcome and should provide the company with enough new capital and time to reach that profitability. The open question is what user growth will look like by then.

Deliveroo

Another high-profile food tech player is Deliveroo. Recently its 2016 financials were disclosed, showing zero gross margins and a negative 100% (!) operating margin. It is easy to be cynical (as this funny Twitter exchange between Index Ventures Partner and Deliveroo investor Ben Holmes and skeptic Luke Johnson showed). But perhaps it is far more interesting to try and understand the numbers, to see if there is a path to profitability here:

In the case of Deliveroo there are clear precedents. Of course Deliveroo’s business model is more complicated and operationally risky than Just Eat’s business model. And Deliveroo’s management already disclosed it needs affluent areas with high densities to thrive. There are plenty such places around the world of course. At the same time, rival Uber has lost it’s aura of invincibility (and potentially it’s London license).

Food tech investment has had a major revival in 2017, almost back to 2015 levels. This is partly thanks to large venture capital investments into Delivery Hero (which has been performing above market expectations recently), Deliveroo, Picnic and others. To explore the investment data in more detail, see the below interactive Food Tech VC funding chart:

Interested in a further deep dive into food tech? Check out this Dealroom / Priori Data report from earlier this year. It combines proprietary data from Dealroom and Priori Data with annual reports, investor presentations and equity research about Just Eat, Takeaway.com and Rocket Internet, plus SimilarWeb online traffic data:

Food Delivery Tech Deep Dive

If you have any questions regarding this report or to find out how we can help you with data, intelligence or bespoke research, please do not hesitate to contact us. Contact details are provided inside the report.

Report: European VC fundraising has tripled in three years to about €12 billion today

Written on September 20, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

How much venture capital is out there? Where is it coming from? Is Brexit causing a shift in Europe? This free 17-page Dealroom aims answer these questions, packed with new insights about the European VC landscape.

Underlying data used in this report is available online. If you have any comments on data in this report please contact us via support@dealroom.co.

Fundraising by European Venture Capital Funds

Download the 17-page slide deck now

Key insights:

  • Fundraising by European VC funds has tripled from about €4 billion in 2014 to €12 billion in 2016 and a similar amount likely to be raised in 2017
  • The number of funds grew at the same pace, from 30 to 100 new funds per year, while the average size per fund is constant around €110M
  • In 2016, continental European VC fundraising made a surge, especially in France, Sweden, Netherlands
  • And in 2017 for the first time ever, France leads with €2.7 billion funds raised, vs. €2.3 billion in the UK

Additional resources:

You can now also explore new VC funds by country and per quarter via this New Funds heatmap:

You can also make detailed filters in this New Funds list. For example, these are new Paris-based VCs and corporate funds with Health Tech experience.

 

New: create your own interactive charts

Written on September 16, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

You can now easily create your own interactive charts. This allows you to analyse funding and exit trends by industry, market or any other filter. For example: series-A rounds in London, or VC-backed exits in Europe.

To get started, simply visit Transactions (Rounds or Exits), then use the normal filters, and click on Show Stats. You can view data quarterly or annually. To see the individual transactions inside each quarter click on the columns inside the chart, which will then show the transactions in that period, sorted from large to small.

Click here to get started now!

The left chart shows amounts in € millions (top 3 means: the three largest transactions), while the right chart shows number of transactions.

Your chart creation in stored in the URL, so you can easily share it. For any questions, please feel free to contact us via Intercom inside the app.

Note: excluded from funding totals are: debt rounds, secondary rounds, outside tech, lending capital.

The 2017 State of European Tech is on its way. Contribute now!

Written on September 13, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

Where is Europe’s tech now and where is it headed?

You tell us.

In November 2017, Atomico and Slush will publish their annual State of European Tech report, the most comprehensive deep-dive into the local ecosystem and the issues that impact it most — from talent and capital, to the strength of communities and the challenges and opportunities of deep tech.

A core part of the report is an annual survey of the people that make up the European ecosystem: the entrepreneurs, investors, developers and the individuals across Europe’s many start-up hubs.

Dealroom is proud to support the survey as it sets out to become the definitive dataset of tech communities in Europe.

Please click here to help make they survey a success and have your say

It should take no more than 5 minutes to complete – 5 free Slush 2017 tickets are also up for grabs for those who complete the survey before 8 October.

Thanks for helping to make the voices at the heart of European tech heard.

Horizon 2020 using Dealroom to track 2,400 companies from its €3 billion SME Instrument portfolio

Written on September 10, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

Business case – How to keep track of a €3 billion portfolio?

Horizon 2020 & SME Instrument – Horizon 2020 is a European Union funding programme to support and foster research and innovation. Horizon 2020’s SME Instrument is a €3 billion fund to support high-potential companies to develop “groundbreaking innovative products, services or processes”. The SME Instrument will help 7,500 companies to put their innovations onto the market, by the end of 2020.

Results so far – Since 2014, more than 2,400 SMEs were selected to receive funding (out of more than 31,000 applications) in 36 countries. Investments include well-known companies like Monese, Acast, SnappCar, Swap.com. The fund has already realised 11 exits. To learn more about the fund’s achievements, read the full SME Instrument Impact Report or just check the highlights presentation.

Dealroom.co – Since early 2017, Dealroom provides the SME Instrument team with research and online tools to analyse and track its 2,400 investments. Some of that information is available to you on Dealroom. Click on the image below to explore SME Instrument’s entire portfolio in list view or grid view (pro tip: in grid view, use the top-right menu to pivot different viewpoints).

Identify high-growth companies and trends in Europe using real-time data

Written on August 25, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

Dealroom tracks the growth performance of over 500,000 companies globally, from seed to (very) late stage. In addition to funding and news, Dealroom tracks real-time growth signals (user engagement and employee growth). The report available below is an initial exploration into growth performance across Europe by country, industry, funding and growth stage.

Download report: Comparing growth performance across Europe

Growth performance by country, industry, funding and growth stage

Sometimes it’s useful (and fun) to crunch data without a specific end-goal in mind. This is exactly what we did here. Hence, this report is not yet conclusive but meant to lay the groundwork for more analysis on real-time growth signals going forward. If you’d like us to pursue a specific angle here, please let us know!

Dealroom’s Growth Rank explained

As explained in this previous post, Dealroom tracks the growth performance of over 500,000 companies globally, from seed to (very) late stage. Companies are ranked by growth based on:

  • Estimated website visit from SimilarWeb
  • App store downloads (iOS/Android, via PrioriData)
  • Social media engagement
  • Employee growth (new!)

The growth ranks are based on an algorithm which takes into account growth during the last 6 and 12 months. Growth is adjusted for the base the company is growing from. Out of the 500K+ companies in Dealroom’s database, 220K companies are ranked. Each of those 220K companies has a unique rank (1st, 2nd, …) and is classified into growth percentiles: top 5%, top 10%, top 25% and top half. These growth filters can then be used in combination with other filters (industry, stage, ..) to compare peers and identify high performance companies.

To start using the growth filters, click the below image (or here):

Dealroom: the industry source of record for European tech

Written on August 21, 2017 by Yoram Wijngaarde

More and more publications are recognising Dealroom as the industry standard for data, insights and identifying new trends in European tech: The Financial Times, The Economist, The New York Times, Les Echos, Reuters and many others have featured Dealroom data in 2017. Below is an overview of selected articles:

International

The New York Times on French tech and the launch of Station F

The Economist on the stunning rise of French Tech

Bloomberg on Station F: Francois Hollande Now Works Part-Time in a Mega Campus for Startups

Politico on UK VC funds being overtaken by European venture capital funds, post Brexit

Business Insider on Europe’s most prominent European VC investors

The Financial Times on the need for European scale up capital

The Financial Times on VC funding in France

The Financial Times on VC funding post Brexit

The Financial Times on European Unicorns

TechCrunch on Atomico’s State of European Tech 2016

Reuters on Eastern European tech

VentureBeat on now being the best time ever to be an entrepreneur in Europe

 

United Kingdom

The Independent on Eastern European Tech

Wired UK on the UK’s top investments

Wired UK on Europe leading the way in AI

Wired UK on Investments in London despite Brexit

Wired UK on State of European Tech report

Evening Standard on France overtaking UK in fundraising by Venture Capital funds

 

France

Les Echos on Europe as the gravitational center of Deep Tech

Les Echos on why French tech is opening its borders

Les Echos on France overtaking UK in fundraising by Venture Capital funds

La Tribune on France overtaking UK in fundraising by Venture Capital funds

Germany

Wired DE on Tech in Europe

Berlin Valley on the startup news of the week

 

Italy

Il Sole 24 Ore with multiple posts featuring Dealroom

Il Corriere De La Sera on startups in Italy

Il Corriere De La Sera on challenges of Italian Venture Capital

 

Spain

La Vanguardia on Europen Startups fund raising

La Vanguardia on Madrid versus Barcelona as startup capitals

 

Logos of news websites we have been featured in

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